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Scotland's national team
#81
Scott Brown should be on the bench at most.

 
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#82
So I see the SFA have defied FIFA's authority and are going to display the poppy against England next week.

http://www.scottishfa.co.uk/scottish_fa_...tegoryID=1

They're needlessly risking a fine and/or points deduction, as well as setting a terrible example to member clubs in Scotland (ie, it's fine to disobey rules when you don't agree with their interpretation).

If we're fined then that'll be money that could be spent on developing grassroots football instead, and if we're docked points then we might drop in to pot 5 next time round (because let's face it, we're not qualifying for 2018).

Thoughts?

 
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#83
Statement is spot on in my mind and doubt there will be any fine or docking of points, Fifa would look very silly if they tried to dish out this.  Looks to be storm in a tea cup this one and doubt many would disagree with Scotland or England taking this common sense approach.
 
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#84
After being grassed up by Damian Collins MP, chairman of the Westminster Culture, Media and Sport select committee, Ireland have now been charged by FIFA for displaying a message commemorating the Easter Rising.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/37872020

There's no word yet on what their punishment would be, but would expect the FA and SFA to get a more severe sanction given they're openly defying the governing body, whereas it looks as if Ireland just did it without asking first.

 
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#85
Unfortunately this is more about the poppy police than anything else, when I was growing up you bought your poppy a few days before remembrance Sunday and wore it for a few days and that was that. Nowadays if you are on TV you're wearing it 2-3 weeks before and are accused of being uncaring if you don't wear one, football latterly wore a poppy on the shirt on remembrance weekend now some are 2 weeks earlier.
Personally I think football clubs should just have a minutes silence on the Saturday/Sunday closest to the 11th Nov and not bother with the poppy, some only use stickers and they come off during the game anyway will the do-gooders want games stopped so poppies can be put back on?
 
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#86
I think FIFA are being ridiculous banning the poppy, it is a symbol of rememberance, nothing political about it. I don't know if I'm just extra sensitive being ex-forces, but I think it's not just wrong, it's downright disrespectful. A club or country can wear black armbands to pay tribute to people connected to the team that have died, surely a mark of respect for the thousands that died to protect their country isn't too much to ask?!
 
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#87
(11-08-2016, 05:39 PM)Rocco Wrote: I think FIFA are being ridiculous banning the poppy, it is a symbol of rememberance, nothing political about it. I don't know if I'm just extra sensitive being ex-forces, but I think it's not just wrong, it's downright disrespectful. A club or country can wear black armbands to pay tribute to people connected to the team that have died, surely a mark of respect for the thousands that died to protect their country isn't too much to ask?!

Interesting to note that Northern Ireland have gone down the (entirely within FIFA rules) approach of having a plain black armband (plus no doubt a minute's silence, as I'm sure there will be at Wembley- again within the rules). Both squads will also no doubt do photo-ops at a memorial site at some point this week

Thing is, this isn't about the poppy itself anymore (as evidenced by them not simply wearing plain black armbands) - it's become a stick with which to beat FIFA - look at how Theresa May jumped on the bandwagon to try and score a cheap political point. FIFA have a clear directive laid down by the IFAB, that national team shirts should be free of political or commercial messages. If they were to allow the poppy to be worn on their shirts (or indeed if they didn't sanction the 2 associations) it sets an awkward precedent for other nations who may wish to display less wholesome messages or plaster their kits with a plethora of sponsors logos
"The heart of the club is the fan. The board and the chairman are custodians. The staff are transient. But the fan is there forever"

Roy Macgregor, April 2013
 
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#88
(11-08-2016, 08:38 PM)VanderDalgarno Wrote: FIFA have a clear directive laid down by the IFAB, that national team shirts should be free of political or commercial messages. If they were to allow the poppy to be worn on their shirts (or indeed if they didn't sanction the 2 associations) it sets an awkward precedent for other nations who may wish to display less wholesome messages or plaster their kits with a plethora of sponsors logos

The poppy is neither political nor commercial.

It is about taking the time to remember those (not just british but all) who never made it home to their families after defending their country.

This isn't an issue with any other group or organisation. I'm sure most of us just saw Andy Murray become the WTA world number one, with a poppy on his shirt.  Football (FIFA) seems to complicate and read these things wrong IMO.  Undecided
 
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#89
What odds on a red for Scott Brown?

 
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#90
(11-09-2016, 02:43 PM)frankthetank Wrote: The poppy is neither political nor commercial.

Try telling that to James McClean.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/footbal...poppy.html

It might not be political to you, but it clearly is to others.  Therefore, it's a political symbol whether we like it or not.

But regardless of that debate, what's to be gained from openly defying FIFA and risking a points deduction?  We never used to put poppies on football shirts.  Are our footballers now being denied the opportunity to show their respect?  Is a minute silence pre-match not enough respect?  It used to be, so do we now need to show more respect than in the past?  How much additional respect does printing and displaying a poppy on a football shirt for 90 minutes give?

And relevantly for us, does County's decision on Sunday to have a minute silence, but not to put poppies on their shirts mean the club have openly disrespected the Fallen?  Or is it all much ado about nothing?

 
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#91
(11-09-2016, 05:08 PM)Forfinn Wrote: Try telling that to James McClean.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/footbal...poppy.html

I don't agree with James McClean and i suppose he doesnt much agree with me, its not about HIM. i'm not going to push my views on to him, therefore I don't expect him to push his view on to me (or others who share my opinion that a poppy isn't a political symbol) 
If players with to pay respect by having a poppy on a black armband whilst in a match, I'm all for it and can't see any harm in it. 
 
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#92
Hmmm trying to reply to messages on my mobile isn't always a good idea. I've no idea how the text ended up in different fonts lol ?. Hope it makes a little sense even if you disagree.
 
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#93
In the crazy word we live in you could argue that denying a player the right to wear a poppy is an infringement of his human rights as per Human Rights Act article 9. I'm not saying its right or wrong, but this is the way of the world.
 
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#94
We play the same players every qualifying campaign, yet are somehow surprised when we don't qualify again.

Time to get a good manager in, whichever nationality, and give the good young players a chance. Brown, Berra, D.Fletcher, Hutton. S.Fletcher, Naismith, etc. have had far too many opportunities.

Tried and failed squad.
 
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#95
Every two years I really wish I went to France 98, the only final Scotland made where I was old enough to go, just....

What made last night worse was we were the better team for large parts but still got humped. A bit like watching Ross County these days.
 
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#96
(11-12-2016, 01:37 PM)JailendLoyal Wrote: We play the same players every qualifying campaign, yet are somehow surprised when we don't qualify again.

Time to get a good manager in, whichever nationality, and give the good young players a chance. Brown, Berra, D.Fletcher, Hutton. S.Fletcher, Naismith, etc. have had far too many opportunities.

Tried and failed squad.

It does look a bit like a team that needs something new.  Scott Brown, can't bring myself to get behind him even in a Scotland shirt.   His encounter with "Kovy" a few years back now was the last straw for me!!!!
 
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#97
We looked decent for spells last night, but we are ridiculously porous at the back, every time England got forward, I got a horrible sinking feeling in my stomach. The choice of centre halves in the squad is dire, but Strachan never seems to look at trying anyone new, no matter how poor we look defensively, over and over.
 
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#98
This campaign's over already. Two whole decades without qualification.

Time to punt any of the old guard who won't contribute again to the next campaign to back-up roles at best and start bleeding the youth. Oliver Burke, for one, should start every game from now on (IMO opinion he should have been starting the last two games anyway).
There's also no point Strachan being there now because he's blatently not the man who's going to take us to Euro 2020.
.: Ours, is the Fury :.

 
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#99
I said it earlier in this thread, Strachan should have walked after the last qualifying campaign.

Finishing FOURTH in the group behind Ireland and Poland was terrible imo!
 
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Gordon's staying on then. Financial decision? Nobody better to replace him? It's certainly not due to results or the entertaining football being played!

http://m.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/38019477
 
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